Comfortably Numb

Sheila Kumar's Storehouse

Book review: Writing the City, edited by Stuti Khanna

Depicted as experienced  This slim volume contains literary essays that artfully entwine the perfectly compatible strands of travel and personal memoir to good effect. A list of known names write about the cities they have situated their works in, the cities of their imagination versus the reality, the cities that strike a creative chord in…

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Book review: Shadow City, A Woman Walks Kabul by Taran Khan

Shadow City, A Woman Walks Kabul by Taran N. Khan. Penguin Books. Taran Khan`s logic is beautiful in its simplicity: her way of getting to know a city is to walk the city. In this case, the chosen city is Kabul (not the best place to be walking about, you`d imagine) which she says  `shimmered…

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Book review: The White Umbrella By Brian Sewell

Travels with a donkey Some books are a delight to read and Brian Sewell’s novella The White Umbrella:  The Englishman and the Donkey of Peshawar  falls fair and square in this category. A  quaint and charming  yarn, it`s a good read in these trying times. The late Sewell, famous art critic/ columnist/ author/ media personality,…

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Book review: One More Croissant for the Road by Felicity Cloake

ONE MORE CROISSANT FOR THE ROAD by Felicity Cloake. HarperCollinsUK. 2019 release. As if the title wasn’t one big pull in itself, this witty travelogue features one famous and popular French recipe at the close of  every chapter. The omelette soufflé, ratatouille, clafoutis, quiche Lorraine, madeleines, they are all in here. Which led to my…

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Book review: Four Seasons in Rome by Anthony Doerr

Four Seasons in Rome by Anthony Doerr. HarperCollins UK. 2007 release. Taking up two disparate strands, that of rearing newborn twins and of spending a year in the Eternal City, Anthony Doerr, Pulitzer-prize winning author of All The Light We Cannot See, gives us a most charming travelogue-memoir. He`s funny about his boys: The boys…

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Book review: Around The World In 80 Trains

Around The World in 80 Trains by Monisha Rajesh. Bloomsbury Books. Straight off the bat, let me say it: This book is such a delightful,  easy read. I read Rajesh`s debut Around India in 80 Trains some years ago, and quite enjoyed it but this one I positively relished. It combines strands of a love…

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Book review: Behind the Wall by Colin Thubron

  Just when the first lockdown was enforced,  I started on one of my fave travel writer Colin Thubron`s 1988 China travelogue, Behind the Wall. And I only just finished reading it. It`s not an easy book to read, and it`s even more difficult to review. Oh, Thubron is at the top of his game…

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Book review: Revolutionary Ride by Lois Pryce

Revolutionary Ride by Lois Pryce. Hachette india. About halfway into this book, an account of the author`s foray into Iran in 2011 on her motorcycle, I realised the book was less travelogue and more a political account of modern-day Iran. However,  I had no grouse with that because Pryce stays on-point all through, and the…

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Travel: Magical Mostar

  This is beauty after strife. Mostar sparkles anew after the terrible years of the Bosnian War. You will find a reflective   mood  settling upon you at Mostar in Bosnia-Herzegovina. It is a lovely little town through which the River Nevretska flows swiftly, steadily, a deep teal-blue in colour. At the designated times, the melodious…

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Book review: Upon a Sleepless Isle by Andrew Fidel Fernando

Sweet and hot sambol As I ate a vegetable-stuffed roti sitting on the rock, an East Asian couple spotted me and became transfixed, in the way safari-goers might upon seeing rare wildlife. At first they viewed and photographed me from a   safe distance, wary, perhaps, of sending me scurrying into the bushes. They then inched…

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