Comfortably Numb

Sheila Kumar's Storehouse

Book review: This Life at Play by Girish Karnad

This Life At Play, the English translation of Karnad`s Aadaadtha Aayushya, translated from Kannada by Girish Karnad and Srinath Perur (HarperCollins Books),  gives readers a clear glimpse of a man of formidable intellect, a man who wrote plays that were sheer genius (some of them at least), a good actor, a very good writer, and…

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Book review: A Death in Shonagachchi by Rijula Das

Murder and murk in the City of Joy  With such a straightforward title, what the reader expects is a Shonagachchi crime,  and that is indeed what the reader gets. To unravel the backstory to the deed, we are taken to South Asia`s largest red-light district, with all its  murk, heartbreak, violence,  and unexpected pockets of…

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Book review: Ancient India, Culture of Contradictions by Upinder Singh

In what is easily one of the best non-fiction works to release this year, Upinder Singh’s Ancient India is aimed at a reading audience with an interest in history, the curiosity to compare ancient and modern, or to just read more about India’s backstories. It throws a clear light on its point of focus: the…

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Book review: Orienting, an Indian in japan by Pallavi Aiyar

Nippon under the lens  Pallavi Aiyar,  peripatetic traveller and charming chronicler of Things She Sees, delivers once again. Orienting is her Japan book, a montage she has collated for the edification of her readers, culled from her experiences in that country. It`s an easy read, filled with gently offered insights, where the things to be…

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Book review: The House Next to the Factory by Sonal Kohli

The lives of others  It`s a quiet  gaze that is turned on the tales in The House Next To The Factory. This book of short stories is author Sonal Kohli’s debut and it`s an assured debut. Set in Delhi, spanning timelines between 1980 and 2010, the stories are inter-linked, with some characters in one story…

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Book review: The Good Girls by Sonia Faleiro

The Good Girls, An Ordinary Killing by Sonia Faleiro. Penguin Books.   If there is only one book you want to read to close your account for 2021, let it be this book, please.   Faleiro, whose writing style and credentials need no burnishing, goes to Katra village in western UP`s Badaun district, to investigate…

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Book review: Fifth Avenue, 5 am by Sam Wasson

FIFTH AVENUE, 5 AM by Sam Wasson, (Harper Perennial Books) is a delightful peek at everything that went into the making of the iconic Breakfast at Tiffany`s, into the making of its director Blake Edwards as also its much acclaimed  heroine Audrey Hepburn, Henry Mancini who provided the score, and last but certainly not the…

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Book review: Lahore by Manreet Sodhi Someshwar

When Loar went up in flames In this book, the first of Sodhi Someshwar`s ambitious Partition trilogy, intense focus is trained on the city that buzzed with commerce, industry, life  and living. In the run-up to Partition, Lahore had a large presence of Sikhs, a sizeable population of Hindus, and a Muslim majority who went…

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Book review: The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd

`The most appalling quality of water is its strength. I love its flash and gleam, its music, its pliancy and grace, its slap against my body; but I fear its strength…the mysteries in its movement…(the way) it slips out of holes in the earth like the ancient snake.`   To read THE LIVING MOUNTAIN (Canongate…

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Book review: The Discomfort of Evening by Marieke Lucas Rijneveld

This girl`s life The Man International Booker-winner for 2020 puts grief under the microscope It is an unescapable fact that some books draw you into the story gently while others take hold of you and plunge you into its pages in one deep dunk. The Discomfort of Evening, Marieke Lucas Rijneveld`s coming-of-age story of a…

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