Comfortably Numb

Sheila Kumar's Storehouse

Book review: Fifth Avenue, 5 am by Sam Wasson

FIFTH AVENUE, 5 AM by Sam Wasson, (Harper Perennial Books) is a delightful peek at everything that went into the making of the iconic Breakfast at Tiffany`s, into the making of its director Blake Edwards as also its much acclaimed  heroine Audrey Hepburn, Henry Mancini who provided the score, and last but certainly not the…

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Book review: Lahore by Manreet Sodhi Someshwar

When Loar went up in flames In this book, the first of Sodhi Someshwar`s ambitious Partition trilogy, intense focus is trained on the city that buzzed with commerce, industry, life  and living. In the run-up to Partition, Lahore had a large presence of Sikhs, a sizeable population of Hindus, and a Muslim majority who went…

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Book review: The Living Mountain by Nan Shepherd

`The most appalling quality of water is its strength. I love its flash and gleam, its music, its pliancy and grace, its slap against my body; but I fear its strength…the mysteries in its movement…(the way) it slips out of holes in the earth like the ancient snake.`   To read THE LIVING MOUNTAIN (Canongate…

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Book review: The Discomfort of Evening by Marieke Lucas Rijneveld

This girl`s life The Man International Booker-winner for 2020 puts grief under the microscope It is an unescapable fact that some books draw you into the story gently while others take hold of you and plunge you into its pages in one deep dunk. The Discomfort of Evening, Marieke Lucas Rijneveld`s coming-of-age story of a…

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Book review: False Allies by Manu S. Pillai

FALSE ALLIES India`s Maharajahs in the Age of Ravi Varma by Manu Pillai  (Juggernaut Books). The book is something of an eye- opener for those whose opinion of Indian princes of the past  was less than favourable, who placed them all in one velvet-lined drawer of history, labelling them degenerates/despots/dissolute beings. So yes, some of…

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Book review: The Oracle of Karuthupuzha by Manu Bhattathiri

Of human nature Over the course of three books,  Savithri’s Special Room and Other Stories,  The Town That Laughed, and now The Oracle of Karuthupuzha, Manu Bhattathiri has spun into being the little hamlet of Karuthupuzha somewhere in Kerala, peopled it with a  fair share of average and eccentric denizens, and regularly stirred up little storms in…

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Book review: Anti-Clock by VJ James

The coffin-maker`s tale Hendri the coffin-maker is consumed by hatred for his Nemesis, Satan Loppo. He yearns  to see Loppo lowered into the coffin he has personally prepared for him. Taking off from this peg,  ‘Anti- Clock’ by V. J. James has a sweeping arc touching on many subjects, and the philosophical ruminations that Hendri…

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Book review: Rumours of Spring by Farah Bashir

A life of loss Farah Bashir’s poignant memoir is set in the Kashmir of the nineties. It`s a coming-of-age novel, only, in that particular period,  coming of age meant navigating the challenges of living in the lethal shadow of conflict. The memoir examines a combat zone, the survival skills and state of mind that needs…

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Book review: My Salinger Year by Joanna Rakoff

`We must talk about Jerry` MY SALINGER YEAR by Joanna Rakoff. Bloomsbury Books, 2014 release. Obviously, the author will have Salinger fans at the second word in the book`s title, but it really is a lovely read, all of it. The peg is irresistible: a young New Yorker freshly graduated having majored in literature, goes…

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Book review: Ikigai by Hector Garcia and Francesc Miralles

My Wednesday review of this week is going to be a most enthusiastic one. Just finished reading IKIGAI, The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life  by  Hector Garcia and Francesc Miralles (Penguin UK Books), and I totally recommend everyone has a go at this. It`s a neat but not dumbed down  simplification of…

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